Suspect in Fatal DUI Crash Behind Bars Again

Sandra Jacobson is back in jail again after being arrested for driving with a suspended license. Her license was suspended in early January 2009, over two weeks before the she caused the crash that killed Kathy Krasniewicz 54, and Kate McClelland, 71.

Jacobson is accused of losing control of her truck and sideswiping a taxi headed to Denver International Airport (DIA) and causing the crash that killed the two Connecticut librarians.

Jacobson did not stop at the crash scene and was arrested later at DIA. A blood alcohol test administered nearly 5 and a half hours after the crash showed Jacobson’s BAC (Blood Alcohol Level) to be .164 percent – more than double the Colorado legal limit of .08 percent. Jacobson’s lawyer contents that his client’s BAC could have been caused by cold medicine and that the crash occured when her dogs tried to jump over the seat to get to some food. Detectives at the scene testified that Jacobson was not aware that she had hit another vehicle.

Jacobson was arrested earlier this week when a parole officer spotted Jacobson

“get into a car and drive away after class. She drove away by herself in a light blue, late model BMW.”

According to court documents, the parole officer was attending the same Leadership and Ethics class held at Colorado Technical University as Jacobson.

As part of her bond, Jacobson was required to refrain from consuming alcohol which was monitored by an ankle monitor which measures alcohol secreted through the skin. After two strikes, Jacobson’s bond was revoked in April. During a March hearing evidence was presented that there were problems with Jacobson’s ankle monitor including that the device had been tampered with and that something had become lodged between the monitor and her skin. Then in April, authorities again detected activity in the ankle bracelet. Her attorney defended his client by claiming the nine hour spike was caused by floor cleaner. After bonding out on April 28, Jacobson’s ankle monitor showed a confirmed reading of alcohol consumption on July 8th.

Denver District Judge Sheila Rappaport ordered new testing requirements for Jacobson. She must now submit to breath-alcohol tests every four hours to a Sobrietor installed in her home. The device uses voice-recognition technology to ensure that Jacobson is taking the tests. Additionally Rappaport ordered Jacobson submit to random urine tests.

Jacobson has a history of traffic offenses dating back ten years, including 3 speeding citations and a crash in 2007 that sent a man to the hospital with a broken pelvis and other injuries.

She will remain at the Denver District Jail until a Denver District judge rules on revoking her bail. Let’s hope the judge has the good sense to keep Colorado drivers safe and keep Jacobson locked up.