Archive for the ‘Miscellaneous’ Category

Accutane: a Miracle Drug to Cure Acne or Deadly Remedy?

To most users, Accutane, one of the most potent, effective weapons against acne, is a miracle drug. But, to others Accutane leads to a life filled with pain and discomfort and in some cases, death.

First introduced in 1982 by the drug maker Hoffman-La Roche, Acctutane became of their top sellers with an estimated 1.2 billion dollar in sales.Despite reports as early as 1984 of serious adverse reactions including miscarriages and birth defects, the FDA decided to allow the sale of Accutane relying on doctors’ discretion and wisdom to properly prescribe the drug. Other adverse effects include inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s Disease, suicide, loss of bone density and bone fractures, muscle weakness, chapped lips and nose bleeds, Hoffman-La Roche refused to recall their product.

The side effects related to Accutane are so severe that the FDA now requires all patients who take Accutane to sign a consent form. Since 1996, pharmacists are required to give patients a Medication Guide which details the risks. Thalidomide and Mifeprex are the only other drugs that have required a Medication Guide.

In 1997 European authorities placed strict controlling measures on Accutane because of reports of serious psychiatric disorders associated with the drug. But, it wasn’t until the death by suicide in May 2000 of Michigan Congressman Bart Stupak’s son, BJ while taking the drug, that public awareness of the dangerous link between Accutane and suicide emerged. In response, a spokesperson for Roche claims that it has been used safely by over 13 million patients and that severe acne in itself can cause depression.

So, you decide…is Accutane a miracle cure or deadly remedy?

Big Changes to Colorado Insurance Law Means You Get the Uninsured Motorist Coverage You Pay For (Part Five – What Should You Do?

As we learned in parts one through four, Colorado Revised Statute 10-4-609, effective January 1, 2008, addresses uninsured motorists (UM) and under-insured (UIM) motorist claims and closes the loopholes that prevented consumers from receiving the full benefits they thought they were buying when purchasing UM/UIM coverage in Colorado.

What Should You Do?
Call your insurance company today! This act takes effect January 1, 2008, and it applies to any policy issued or renewed on or after January 1, 2008. It does not automatically update or retro activate an existing policy. You must notify your insurance company and write a new policy or renew your existing policy.

What Else Do I Need to Know?
The new law requires insurance companies to provide consumers with the option of carrying equal limits of UM/UIM as up to the bodily injury liability limits. So, what that means is; if your liability coverage is $100,000 then you are eligible for $100,000 in UM/UIM coverage.

Saving Money by Dropping the Premiums on Additional Cars is Not a Good Idea.
Your insurance agent may try to talk you into dropping coverage on additional cars is not a good idea and here

Big Changes to Colorado Insurance Law Means You Get the Uninsured Motorist Coverage You Pay For (Part Four – “Set-off” and “Anti-Stacking”)

Now that we know about liability insurance and uninsured and under-insured coverages and how insurance companies used “set-off” and “anti-stacking” together to lessen your coverage, let’s talk about how insurance companies used “set-off” and “anti-stacking” together.

Could “Set-off” and “Anti-Stacking” be Used Together?
Prior to January 1, 2008, insurance companies could reduce your compensation by “setting off” and “anti-stacking” your compensation at the same time. The law now prohibits that practice.

Read On…

Big Changes to Colorado Insurance Law Means You Get the Uninsured Motorist Coverage You Pay For (Part Three – “Anti-Stacking”)

In parts one and two, we learned about liability and uninsured and under-insured coverages and how insurance companies can no longer “set-off” reduce the amount of your UM coverage.

What is “Anti-Stacking”?
Another change in the law stops insurance companies from using “anti-stacking” language when writing a policy. Prior to the new law, insurance companies could collect premiums for UM/UIM coverage on multiple policies covering multiple cars in the same household. However, they would not allow the policy holder to use these multiple coverages at the same time.

Example:
Andrew and Samantha were both driving on the interstate when Samantha rear-ended Andrew’s car because she was distracted while talking on her cell phone. Samantha was uninsured. As a result of the accident Andrew had medical expenses and lost wages totaling $250,000. In addition to his liability coverage, Andrew had purchased and paid premiums on three separate $100,000 UM/UIM policies for each of his three cars for a total of $300,000.

Conclusion Before January 1, 2008:
Andrew’s insurance policy contained anti-stacking language which allowed the insurance company to limit Andrew’s coverage to only $100,000 of UM/UIM benefits on one car policy despite the fact that Andrew paid for UM coverage on 3 different vehicles, paying premiums for $300,000. His coverage was $150,000 short.

Conclusion After January 1, 2008:
Under the law change, Andrew was able to combine or “stack” his three policies for a total of $300,000 which was more than enough to cover his $250,000 in medical expenses and lost wages.

To be continued. Next up: Can “Set-off” and “Anti-Stacking Be Used Together?

Big Changes to Colorado Insurance Law Means You Get the Uninsured Motorist Coverage You Pay For (Part Two – “Set-Off”)

In part one we learned about how Colorado Revised Statute 10-4-609 effects your insurance coverage and about thedifferent types of coverage; liability and uninsured and under-insured insurance.
Here’s how it all fits together.

What is “Setoff”?
Prior to January 1, 2008, your insurance company would be able to “setoff” or reduce the amount of UM coverage they would have to pay you by the amount of liability insurance available from the at fault driver.

Read On…

Big Changes to Colorado Insurance Law Means You Get the Uninsured Motorist Coverage You Pay For (Part One)

The newly revised Colorado Revised Statute 10-4-609, effective January 1, 2008, addresses uninsured motorists (UM) and under-insured (UIM) motorist claims and closes the loopholes that prevented consumers from receiving the full benefits they thought they were buying when purchasing UM/UIM coverage in Colorado.

What is Liability Insurance?
Property damage liability coverage pays for the physical damage to the vehicle damaged in the accident by the at-fault driver. Bodily injury liability coverage provides compensation for injuries sustained in a motor vehicle collision. The State of Colorado requires that every owner of an car have at least $25,000.00 in bodily injury liability insurance coverage.

What is Uninsured (UM) or Under-Insured (UIM) Insurance?
Despite the fact that Colorado law requires every automobile owner in Colorado to maintain insurance on their vehicle, many drivers who cause accidents do not have car insurance and are therefore “uninsured motorists.” In other cases, the driver who caused an accident may be insured but may not have enough coverage to pay for all of the injuries caused in the accident and is “under-insured.” We are frequently asked, “What happens to my case if the person who caused the accident is uninsured or doesn’t have enough insurance?”

Read On…

Premarin Risks Keep Stacking Up

For millions of women taking Premarin to ease their symptoms of menopause, including hot flashes, night sweats and vaginal dryness, a newly released study is another blow to finding relief for their discomfort.

According to a new Women’s Health Initiative study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, women who take conjugated equine estrogen are at double the risk of developing benign proliferative breast disease. Tom Rohan, MBBS, Ph.D. of Albert Einstein College of Medicine and his colleagues report benign proliferative breast disease is thought to be an early stage of in the development of breast cancer and may increase the risk of later carcinoma.

Read On…

Colorado Baby’s Death could bring Additional Murder Charge

Mesa County prosecutors are considering additional charges against Lonnie Herrera, who is accused of fatally shooting his pregnant girlfriend, Anna Maria Macias, now that the baby she was carrying has died. Anna Maria Macias, who was about 8 1/2 months pregnant, was killed on Sunday night when she was shot in the neck. A baby girl, the family named Maria, born by caesarean section at St. Mary’s Hospital in Grand Junction, died overnight when she was removed from life support.

Read On…

No Murder Charge in Death of Baby

Mesa County District Court Judge Richard Gurley ruled that the death of a fetus delivered at eight and a half month gestation, due to a car crash is not murder under Colorado state law.

On November 6, 2007, Logan Lage was leading Colorado State Patrol on a high speed chase when he crashed head on into Shea Lenen’s SUV. She was eight and a half months pregnant. Shea’s baby was delivered by an emergency c-section. Baby Lileigh lived for about an hour before she died. The coroner ruled the death as a homicide.

Read On…